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Do you really know how something impacts your life? Many people who are suffering from childhood or adult trauma do not realize the impact the trauma has on their day-to-day lives. The fact is, trauma impacts our lives in very real ways and there are far more negative ways of “coping” with the related symptoms than there is positive public information on the subject, which is why I am writing this blog post.

According to the Support Alliance, When we witness or experience a traumatic event, such as an act of violence or a natural disaster, we are affected mentally and emotionally. Whether we are personally involved in the incident, have family or friends who are injured or killed, are a rescue worker or health care provider, or even if we learn about the event through the news, we will experience some sort of emotional response. Each of us will react differently and there is no right or wrong way to feel. The emotional response each person has is a normal part of the healing process.

The emotional responses that are typical are isolation, anger, or drinking / drug abuse. These are all unhealthy but common responses. What people don’t talk about often is the depression associated with trauma. And while many of us understand why someone who has been witness to, or the victim, of trauma would be depressed- we often don’t knowledge it or offer help! The number of traumatic events you have previously experienced may also affect your response, leading to severe depression, which is why I stress that people pay attention to their specific symptoms, and be ready to seek help if symptoms should persist or worsen.

Rates of depression are very high in people who experience PTSD. In one study supported by the National Institute of Mental Health , 40 percent of people who had PTSD were experiencing depression one month and four months later. Early intervention is extremely helpful in treating PTSD and depression. Rates of depression are very high in people who experience PTSD. In one study supported by the National Institute of Mental Health , 40 percent of people who had PTSD were experiencing depression one month and four months later. Early intervention is extremely helpful in treating PTSD and depression.

If you’re thinking your depression is “just feeling upset by what happened”, think again. Depression is associated with trauma and can make all the other symptoms associated with trauma and PTSD worse.  I am available to help out with either or both depression and trauma. Please click here to set up your free consultation.

 

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