Archive: Holistic Health

The biggest adventure you’ll ever take

 

A friend is in mourning: she had a dream of opening up a care centre with her savings. That dream was dashed when the Covid-19 pandemic hit: her business took a steep dive, and instead of adding to her dream fund, she had to use that fund to stay afloat.  It took her a few months to even admit this huge personal loss to herself, it was so important to her.

As a coach (and therapist), I tend to caution clients (and friends, when they ask) against being unrealistic in their dreaming, with one caveat: to know the kind of life that would, at the end of it all, bring them a sense of satisfaction and peace.

Many of our dreams are being dashed with this pandemic, except for one – living the biggest adventure you’ll ever take – your life. The thing about adventures is that you never know what’s around the corner. If you have any pre-conceived ideas of what that might look like, you will probably be in for an unpleasant surprise (I won’t bore you with the many clichés covering this, like “man plans … god laughs“, etc).

Adventures are about dealing with the unexpected and unknown, about finding and honing the resources we already have and testing ourselves against what’s in front of us. That adventure is constantly there, and constantly changing.

That dream my friend had? It won’t go to waste. I know her – she’ll mourn the loss of that beautiful dream, then dream even bigger.

To raise brave girls, encourage adventure

 

Quote of the Week 

The biggest adventure you can ever take is to live the life of your dreams.”
― Oprah Winfrey

Announcements 

Need more? At times we need more  – we know the logic, know what to do. And yet something is still blocking us.  I offer both one-on-one consultations and coaching packages.  For more information, visit my website www.thejoyofliving.co/services-and-programs or contact me directly at maryanne@thejoyofliving.co .

 

Maryanne Nicholls is a Registered Psychotherapist and Life Coach.  To find out more, gain access to her weekly newsletter, meditations and programmes, sign up at www.thejoyofliving.co.

The biggest adventure you’ll ever take

 

A friend is in mourning: she had a dream of opening up a care centre with her savings. That dream was dashed when the Covid-19 pandemic hit: her business took a steep dive, and instead of adding to her dream fund, she had to use that fund to stay afloat.  It took her a few months to even admit this huge personal loss to herself, it was so important to her.

As a coach (and therapist), I tend to caution clients (and friends, when they ask) against being unrealistic in their dreaming, with one caveat: to know the kind of life that would, at the end of it all, bring them a sense of satisfaction and peace.

Many of our dreams are being dashed with this pandemic, except for one – living the biggest adventure you’ll ever take – your life. The thing about adventures is that you never know what’s around the corner. If you have any pre-conceived ideas of what that might look like, you will probably be in for an unpleasant surprise (I won’t bore you with the many clichés covering this, like “man plans … god laughs“, etc).

Adventures are about dealing with the unexpected and unknown, about finding and honing the resources we already have and testing ourselves against what’s in front of us. That adventure is constantly there, and constantly changing.

That dream my friend had? It won’t go to waste. I know her – she’ll mourn the loss of that beautiful dream, then dream even bigger.

 

Announcements 

If you like this blog, you’ll also like my newsletters. It’s written only for my insiders who sign up, and provides weekly insights, not only from me, but from others I admire.

To sign up  for my insider newsletter, click here. If you find it doesn’t work for you, all you have to do to unsubscribe is click on the link at the bottom of the newsletter.

Looking forward to welcoming you to my growing list of insiders!

Maryanne

 

Maryanne Nicholls is a Registered Psychotherapist.  To find out more, gain access to her weekly newsletter, meditations and programmes, sign up at www.thejoyofliving.co 

Social Distancing and Affection

Our choices determine our destiny.” A man called Alfonzo Bernard said this, and has influenced thousands of people with his words. He’s currently pastor of a Christian congregation in Brooklyn NY. I came across his name as I was listening to one of those people he influenced, and discovered his influence on me with what he said about distance in human relationships – so apropos for us all today.

In one of his many Youtube videos, he talked about the principles of life. The one that really grabbed my attention is this: The life principle that governs distance in human relationships is not in miles but in affection. Two people can be together and miles apart (we’ve all experienced this), or on opposite sides of the planet and affectionately close. We use affection to create distance by withdrawing affection. In reconciliation, we give our affection.

I am very sure there isn’t anyone who is reading this blog who doesn’t have personal experiences that speak to how we distance – it’s on all our minds. The prolonged need for us to remain physically distant from many and not distant from a few, if any, is causing both anxiety and depression. How we deal with this latest challenge can have long-term consequences – good and bad.

In my own life, I’ve lived and worked beside people I chose to dislike, shutting myself off from my own vulnerability and their humanity. Conversely, I have close friends who are countries away – including my husband – who I look forward to connecting with online because their lives mean a lot to me. I’ve withdrawn affection and, when I finally realize I’m shutting down and shutting out, I begin to close the distance by reaching out, human to human.

Today and for a while yet, the only people we can be physically close to are those we live with. We may find ourselves wanting – needing to – create more distance. It’s difficult – having to be physically close over long periods of time, with no reprieve. I’ve met many people who have come up with creative ways of making this happen; from taking scheduled solitary walks, to using their car as an extra “room” away from everyone, to finding an abandoned space they can retreat to. And I’ve met many people who have learned the value of being vulnerable over long distances, and the value of ensuring their long-distance loved ones remain safe.

How are you choosing to live today with social distancing that will inform your destiny tomorrow?

The hidden influence of social networking

 

Quote of the Week 

“The good writers touch life often. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies.” 
― Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

Announcements 

Need more? At times we need more  – we know the logic, know what to do. And yet something is still blocking us.  I offer both one-on-one consultations and coaching packages.  For more information, visit my website www.thejoyofliving.co/services-and-programs or contact me directly at maryanne@thejoyofliving.co .

 

Maryanne Nicholls is a Registered Psychotherapist and Life Coach.  To find out more, gain access to her weekly newsletter, meditations and programmes, sign up at www.thejoyofliving.co.

Social Distancing and Affection

“Our choices determine our destiny.” A man called Alfonzo Bernard said this, and has influenced thousands of people with his words. He’s currently pastor of a Christian congregation in Brooklyn NY. I came across his name as I was listening to one of those people he influenced, and discovered his influence on me with what he said about distance in human relationships – so apropos for us all today.

In one of his many Youtube videos, he talked about the principles of life. The one that really grabbed my attention is this: The life principle that governs distance in human relationships is not in miles but in affection. Two people can be together and miles apart (we’ve all experienced this), or on opposite sides of the planet and affectionately close. We use affection to create distance by withdrawing affection. In reconciliation, we give our affection.

I am very sure there isn’t anyone who is reading this blog who doesn’t have personal experiences that speak to how we distance – it’s on all our minds. The prolonged need for us to remain physically distant from many and not distant from a few, if any, is causing both anxiety and depression. How we deal with this latest challenge can have long-term consequences – good and bad.

In my own life, I’ve lived and worked beside people I chose to dislike, shutting myself off from my own vulnerability and their humanity. Conversely, I have close friends who are countries away – including my husband – who I look forward to connecting with online because their lives mean a lot to me. I’ve withdrawn affection and, when I finally realize I’m shutting down and shutting out, I begin to close the distance by reaching out, human to human.

Today and for a while yet, the only people we can be physically close to are those we live with. We may find ourselves wanting – needing to – create more distance. It’s difficult – having to be physically close over long periods of time, with no reprieve. I’ve met many people who have come up with creative ways of making this happen; from taking scheduled solitary walks, to using their car as an extra “room” away from everyone, to finding an abandoned space they can retreat to. And I’ve met many people who have learned the value of being vulnerable over long distances, and the value of ensuring their long-distance loved ones remain safe.

How are you choosing to live today with social distancing that will inform your destiny tomorrow?

 

Announcements 

If you like this blog, you’ll also like my newsletters. It’s written only for my insiders who sign up, and provides weekly insights, not only from me, but from others I admire.

To sign up  for my insider newsletter, click here. If you find it doesn’t work for you, all you have to do to unsubscribe is click on the link at the bottom of the newsletter.

Looking forward to welcoming you to my growing list of insiders!

Maryanne

 

Maryanne Nicholls is a Registered Psychotherapist.  To find out more, gain access to her weekly newsletter, meditations and programmes, sign up at www.thejoyofliving.co 

Keep Learning

… a seemingly appropriate message for today, since we seemingly have so much extra time in our moated homes. However, if you are at all like me, I am tiring of the smiley faces reminding me of the “plus” sides of being home-bound. I have moments – sometimes days – of immobility. A kind of mild state of depression because my ability to move has been so curtailed.

All for a very good reason. I know and appreciate that – and the people who are keeping me safe. And yet … I feel the annoyance beginning to take over. I prefer to be around people (online at the moment) who are comfortable talking straight and not sunshiny. Some of the sunshiniest people I’ve heard are salaried, have paid-for homes and gardens, and generally see this as a vacation … and needed rest.

For the rest of us, it’s not so sunshiny: We have the same bills and not the same means of paying those bills. Many of us are having to stretch that dollar to cover daily survival needs, like food. So the message “Keep learning” just may make you want to rant and throw things.

However, now that I’ve got it out there, I have found myself taking this time to learn things I would never have considered, due to lack of time. Now I have good reason to learn them.  Because those things might help me increase my badly-diminished client base. Because I’m discovering techniques I’ve never heard of before that really interest me. Because I have time to plan and imagine, which leads to projects I can do from my home.

So, when I’m not immobile, I’m learning. And really enjoying it! Where I might have learned these things anyway under normal circumstances, I would not have had any time to actually enjoy them. Well, I’m enjoying them now! Every one of them.

How to get better at the things you care about – a window of opportunity in these times

 

Quote of the Week 

As long as you keep letting life ask you another question- and reveal that there is always more for you to be and do – you are unstoppable.”
― Jennifer Krause

Announcements 

Need more? At times we need more  – we know the logic, know what to do. And yet something is still blocking us.  I offer both one-on-one consultations and coaching packages.  For more information, visit my website www.thejoyofliving.co/services-and-programs or contact me directly at maryanne@thejoyofliving.co .

Maryanne Nicholls is a Registered Psychotherapist and Life Coach.  To find out more, gain access to her weekly newsletter, meditations and programmes, sign up at www.thejoyofliving.co.

Keep Learning

… a seemingly appropriate message for today, since we seemingly have so much extra time in our moated homes. However, if you are at all like me, I am tiring of the smiley faces reminding me of the “plus” sides of being home-bound. I have moments – sometimes days – of immobility. A kind of mild state of depression because my ability to move has been so curtailed.

All for a very good reason. I know and appreciate that – and the people who are keeping me safe. And yet … I feel the annoyance beginning to take over. I prefer to be around people (online at the moment) who are comfortable talking straight and not sunshiny. Some of the sunshiniest people I’ve heard are salaried, have paid-for homes and gardens, and generally see this as a vacation … and needed rest.

For the rest of us, it’s not so sunshiny: We have the same bills and not the same means of paying those bills. Many of us are having to stretch that dollar to cover daily survival needs, like food. So the message “Keep learning” just may make you want to rant and throw things.

However, now that I’ve got it out there, I have found myself taking this time to learn things I would never have considered, due to lack of time. Now I have good reason to learn them.  Because those things might help me increase my badly-diminished client base. Because I’m discovering techniques I’ve never heard of before that really interest me. Because I have time to plan and imagine, which leads to projects I can do from my home.

So, when I’m not immobile, I’m learning. And really enjoying it! Where I might have learned these things anyway under normal circumstances, I would not have had any time to actually enjoy them. Well, I’m enjoying them now! Every one of them.

Announcements 

If you like this blog, you’ll also like my newsletters. It’s written only for my insiders who sign up, and provides weekly insights, not only from me, but from others I admire.

To sign up  for my insider newsletter, click here. If you find it doesn’t work for you, all you have to do to unsubscribe is click on the link at the bottom of the newsletter.

Looking forward to welcoming you to my growing list of insiders!

Maryanne

 

Maryanne Nicholls is a Registered Psychotherapist.  To find out more, gain access to her weekly newsletter, meditations and programmes, sign up at www.thejoyofliving.co 

The Subway Effect

I’ve been in Manhattan a few times, and as a visitor who isn’t used to the vibrations of Manhattan, I am very aware of that underlying nervous vibrational hum that is ever-present. I imagine in my mind it’s caused by the subway system that runs the length and breadth of that island, but is so much a part of that space and the people living in Manhattan. So much so that it’s considered part of the Manhattan culture (quieted now because of what they’re suffering from the Covid-19 pandemic, and temporary).

Living in downtown Toronto – also high energy and constant – I was surprised to feel it. That heightened energy of the heart of New York City makes Toronto feel like a calm retreat.

Well, it used to feel that way. Here, even with the streets and sidewalks uncharacteristically quiet, that nervous vibration has come to town. I feel it whenever I pass someone as we jointly move to opposite sides of the walkway; when I notice my neighbor (who has seen and spoken to me for at least 5 years regularly) pass me fearfully by without recognition; even when I’m virtually with friends, clients and colleagues as they describe their fears.

People are beginning to want to stay home, to cloister themselves in their home cocoon and see no one. Preferring to spend hours reading, playing video games or watching Netflix rather than do anything creative – because they can’t think; because they don’t want to think … or feel.

This nervous vibration or “subway effect” is increasing.  I think it’s because we don’t know how long our shut down will last, or how it will impact our lives going forward.  As my husband put it when he discovered he wouldn’t be able cross the border to join me for at least 2 more weeks, “I’d be able to handle this a lot better if I knew it was only 2 more weeks. Or even 2 months. As long as I could see an end point.”

The good news is that many are beginning to look towards the future, which means that many communities are beginning to gain some control over the pandemic. Even so, it will likely be at least a month or 2 before we begin to have solid answers on next steps.

Meantime, it’s up to each of us to take steps to calm this nervous energy generated by the unknown ground we all find ourselves in. Here are some suggestions:

  • Begin each day with something grounding and calming. I have my own way, involving clearing my sinuses using a netipot of sterilized salt water, washing my hands and face, taking my temperature, and meditating (It doesn’t have to make sense to the world, just to you). Then I take half an hour to plan my day, never neglecting to acknowledge what is good in my life (Andy and I are both safe and healthy, for instance). What routine or ritual would help set the ground for you?
  • Set your focus on something hopeful. You may not be able to get out, but we all know this will end eventually; the and more we take good precautions, the sooner that will happen. Yes, it’s important to be realistic and understand possible difficulties, but there is no good reason to dwell on them if there is nothing to be done at this time.
  • Do something that gives you either pleasure or mastery ever day. It could be something as simple a making a latte, or taking a hot bath; or filing papers that have been on your to do list for months (or years). It could be writing friends, even if you don’t feel like it. These activities always end up making us feel good, and therefore reinforce that focus over feeling bad.
  • Then, at the end of the day, go to bed at your regular time. Since few of us need to get up and go somewhere daily, it’s tempting to stay up with a bowl of popcorn and watch endless movies – or whatever your favored means of blanking out is. But routine is part of mastery, and discipline helps you maintain routine.

Going to bed and getting up on time, beginning every day with something grounding and calming, setting your focus on something hopeful, and doing something daily that gives you either pleasure or mastery: this will definitely help you remove that “subway effect” in your own life, and even possibly help others do so too.

How we can face the future without fear together

 

Quote of the Week 

Keep walking, though there’s no place to get to.
Don’t try to see through the distances.
That’s not for human beings. Move within,
but don’t move the way fear makes you move.” 

― Rumi, The Book of Love: Poems of Ecstasy and Longing

Announcements 

If you like this blog, you’ll also like my newsletters. It’s written only for my insiders who sign up, and provides weekly insights, not only from me, but from others I admire.

To sign up  for my insider newsletter, click here. If you find it doesn’t work for you, all you have to do to unsubscribe is click on the link at the bottom of the newsletter.

Looking forward to welcoming you to my growing list of insiders!

Maryanne

 

Maryanne Nicholls is a Registered Psychotherapist.  To find out more, gain access to her weekly newsletter, meditations and programmes, sign up at www.thejoyofliving.co 

The Subway Effect

 

I’ve been in Manhattan a few times, and as a visitor who isn’t used to the vibrations of Manhattan, I am very aware of that underlying nervous vibrational hum that is ever-present. I imagine in my mind it’s caused by the subway system that runs the length and breadth of that island, but is so much a part of that space and the people living in Manhattan. So much so that it’s considered part of the Manhattan culture (quieted now because of what they’re suffering from the Covid-19 pandemic, and temporary).

Living in downtown Toronto – also high energy and constant – I was surprised to feel it. That heightened energy of the heart of New York City makes Toronto feel like a calm retreat.

Well, it used to feel that way. Here, even with the streets and sidewalks uncharacteristically quiet, that nervous vibration has come to town. I feel it whenever I pass someone as we jointly move to opposite sides of the walkway; when I notice my neighbor (who has seen and spoken to me for at least 5 years regularly) pass me fearfully by without recognition; even when I’m virtually with friends, clients and colleagues as they describe their fears.

People are beginning to want to stay home, to cloister themselves in their home cocoon and see no one. Preferring to spend hours reading, playing video games or watching Netflix rather than do anything creative – because they can’t think; because they don’t want to think … or feel.

This nervous vibration or “subway effect” is increasing.  I think it’s because we don’t know how long our shut down will last, or how it will impact our lives going forward.  As my husband put it when he discovered he wouldn’t be able cross the border to join me for at least 2 more weeks, “I’d be able to handle this a lot better if I knew it was only 2 more weeks. Or even 2 months. As long as I could see an end point.”

The good news is that many are beginning to look towards the future, which means that many communities are beginning to gain some control over the pandemic. Even so, it will likely be at least a month or 2 before we begin to have solid answers on next steps.

Meantime, it’s up to each of us to take steps to calm this nervous energy generated by the unknown ground we all find ourselves in. Here are some suggestions:

  • Begin each day with something grounding and calming. I have my own way, involving clearing my sinuses using a netipot of sterilized salt water, washing my hands and face, taking my temperature, and meditating (It doesn’t have to make sense to the world, just to you). Then I take half an hour to plan my day, never neglecting to acknowledge what is good in my life (Andy and I are both safe and healthy, for instance). What routine or ritual would help set the ground for you?
  • Set your focus on something hopeful. You may not be able to get out, but we all know this will end eventually; the and more we take good precautions, the sooner that will happen. Yes, it’s important to be realistic and understand possible difficulties, but there is no good reason to dwell on them if there is nothing to be done at this time.
  • Do something that gives you either pleasure or mastery ever day. It could be something as simple a making a latte, or taking a hot bath; or filing papers that have been on your to do list for months (or years). It could be writing friends, even if you don’t feel like it. These activities always end up making us feel good, and therefore reinforce that focus over feeling bad.
  • Then, at the end of the day, go to bed at your regular time. Since few of us need to get up and go somewhere daily, it’s tempting to stay up with a bowl of popcorn and watch endless movies – or whatever your favored means of blanking out is. But routine is part of mastery, and discipline helps you maintain routine.

Going to bed and getting up on time, beginning every day with something grounding and calming, setting your focus on something hopeful, and doing something daily that gives you either pleasure or mastery: this will definitely help you remove that “subway effect” in your own life, and even possibly help others do so too.

Announcements 

If you like this blog, you’ll also like my newsletters. It’s written only for my insiders who sign up, and provides weekly insights, not only from me, but from others I admire.

To sign up  for my insider newsletter, click here. If you find it doesn’t work for you, all you have to do to unsubscribe is click on the link at the bottom of the newsletter.

Looking forward to welcoming you to my growing list of insiders!

Maryanne

 

Maryanne Nicholls is a Registered Psychotherapist.  To find out more, gain access to her weekly newsletter, meditations and programmes, sign up at www.thejoyofliving.co 

Riding the wave

 

Almost every client I see, almost every person I know, wants to have an exciting job, and great home, 2 ½ kids, a successful marriage, manageable expenses, lots of savings, and regular holidays to exotic places. I know a few people and clients who don’t buy into this dream, but honestly, they are countable on maybe 2 hands.

What I just described is sometimes called the “American Dream”; and that dream, while it might have been attainable for most people long ago, isn’t any longer.  The truth is that my parents were closer to realizing that dream than I ever was, and I’m closer than generations following me.  What my parents discovered was that the dream was empty – because there was a hidden cost.  I was about the same age as the daughter in Mad Men, and just as in the series, many of my mother’s friends were drinking too much or in psych wards. That was the cost – society restricted the role of women in order to make jobs available for men. It’s when Women’s Liberation began, and for good reason.

Having said all this, while “having it all” may be a pipe dream, creating a life that makes you feel satisfied and happy is absolutely possible. The first thing to ask yourself, if you really want happiness, is what kind of person are you? Do you have the ambition needed to even attempt the BIG dream? Or, is that something you’ve talked yourself into, or heard so many times you simply don’t question its application to your own life. For instance, those few people I mentioned in the first paragraph? None of them want fame or fortune. They have deliberately chosen a style of life that suits them, and that lifestyle doesn’t include a lot of high-octane risk. It does include risk, but not that kind of risk. In general, they’re happy, and tend to experience joy every day.

If you’re the kind of person who does want something bigger, then it’s important that you understand the risks, and also understand clearly how equipped you are in dealing with all possible consequences. You might fail; you might go broke; you might lose it all; you may have to revamp all your thoughts and plans over and over again. Do you have the stamina to ride through those possibilities? Are you the kind of person who can deal easily with uncertainty, without stress – without driving yourself (and everyone around you) crazy in the process?

If you are, then you know the thrill of riding that wave of chaos. For many of us who’ve experienced this thrill, like most really good and worthwhile things in life, it happens infrequently.  The rest of the time is getting there – preparing, planning, creating, executing those plans, then experiencing the result … tweaking or revamping and trying again. Then moving to the next level and doing it all over.

That’s one thing to understand. The other thing to understand is that none of us get there on our own. Mostly, we rely on those steady others – those steady hearts who work well with less risk and less excitement.

Steady heart or wave rider – we need both. Which are you?

Is there a real you?

 

Quote of the Week
“People who think they know everything are a great annoyance to those of us who do.”
― Isaac Asimov

 

Announcements 

Need more? At times we need more  – we know the logic, know what to do. And yet something is still blocking us.  I offer both one-on-one consultations and coaching packages.  For more information, visit my website www.thejoyofliving.co/services-and-programs or contact me directly at maryanne@thejoyofliving.co .

 

Maryanne Nicholls is a Registered Psychotherapist and Life Coach.  To find out more, gain access to her weekly newsletter, meditations and programmes, sign up at www.thejoyofliving.co.

Riding the wave

 

Almost every client I see, almost every person I know, wants to have an exciting job, and great home, 2 ½ kids, a successful marriage, manageable expenses, lots of savings, and regular holidays to exotic places. I know a few people and clients who don’t buy into this dream, but honestly, they are countable on maybe 2 hands.

What I just described is sometimes called the “American Dream”; and that dream, while it might have been attainable for most people long ago, isn’t any longer.  The truth is that my parents were closer to realizing that dream than I ever was, and I’m closer than generations following me.  What my parents discovered was that the dream was empty – because there was a hidden cost.  I was about the same age as the daughter in Mad Men, and just as in the series, many of my mother’s friends were drinking too much or in psych wards. That was the cost – society restricted the role of women in order to make jobs available for men. It’s when Women’s Liberation began, and for good reason.

Having said all this, while “having it all” may be a pipe dream, creating a life that makes you feel satisfied and happy is absolutely possible. The first thing to ask yourself, if you really want happiness, is what kind of person are you? Do you have the ambition needed to even attempt the BIG dream? Or, is that something you’ve talked yourself into, or heard so many times you simply don’t question its application to your own life. For instance, those few people I mentioned in the first paragraph? None of them want fame or fortune. They have deliberately chosen a style of life that suits them, and that lifestyle doesn’t include a lot of high-octane risk. It does include risk, but not that kind of risk. In general, they’re happy, and tend to experience joy every day.

If you’re the kind of person who does want something bigger, then it’s important that you understand the risks, and also understand clearly how equipped you are in dealing with all possible consequences. You might fail; you might go broke; you might lose it all; you may have to revamp all your thoughts and plans over and over again. Do you have the stamina to ride through those possibilities? Are you the kind of person who can deal easily with uncertainty, without stress – without driving yourself (and everyone around you) crazy in the process?

If you are, then you know the thrill of riding that wave of chaos. For many of us who’ve experienced this thrill, like most really good and worthwhile things in life, it happens infrequently.  The rest of the time is getting there – preparing, planning, creating, executing those plans, then experiencing the result … tweaking or revamping and trying again. Then moving to the next level and doing it all over.

That’s one thing to understand. The other thing to understand is that none of us get there on our own. Mostly, we rely on those steady others – those steady hearts who work well with less risk and less excitement.

Steady heart or wave rider – we need both. Which are you?

 

Announcements 

If you like this blog, you’ll also like my newsletters. It’s written only for my insiders who sign up, and provides weekly insights, not only from me, but from others I admire.

To sign up  for my insider newsletter, click here. If you find it doesn’t work for you, all you have to do to unsubscribe is click on the link at the bottom of the newsletter.

Looking forward to welcoming you to my growing list of insiders!

Maryanne

 

Maryanne Nicholls is a Registered Psychotherapist.  To find out more, gain access to her weekly newsletter, meditations and programmes, sign up at www.thejoyofliving.co